The Best Gaming Keyboard

Updated on 16 November 2022

After 27 hours of research among 52 gaming keyboards and testing 7 of them, we have determined that the Roccat Vulcan 122 is currently the best solution due to its excellent price-quality ratio.

This comparison is certified 100% impartial and follows our selection process.

Our choice, Best mid-range

Roccat Vulcan 122

It is with this model that Roccat really established itself among the top-of-the-range keyboards when it came out. It is quiet and responsive, and compensates for its lack of macro with an efficient in-house system.

£ 149.99 on Amazon

Roccat Vulcan 122

The Vulcan 120 range is still reliable and maintains its excellent reputation. The model we tested impressed us right out of the box with its eye-catching design, and its high-quality, comfortable keyboard: this guarantees a very good position in this competitive market. Its only real flaw is the Roccat Swarm software, which is a little outdated for our taste. Note that a version designed for competition is also available.

 

 

Best budget

SteelSeries Apex 3

This membrane keyboard has everything to please and is perfect for gamers on a budget as well as those who don't like mechanical switches. It is suitable for long sessions thanks to its neat ergonomics.

£ 69.99 on Amazon

The Apex 3 has a quality design and assembly that is consistent with the series, with a clean, uncluttered look. It offers a convincing keystroke for a membrane keyboard, making it suitable for both typing and gaming. It also has a magnetic wrist rest that allows for long sessions of use while reducing joint fatigue.

 

Best high-end

Corsair K100 RGB

This mechanical keyboard has everything you would expect from a high-end model: quality equipment, responsiveness, comfort, dedicated macro and multimedia keys, well-made RGB and effective anti-ghosting.

£ 229.99 on Amazon

Once again, Corsair takes the lead of high-end models with this device that has everything you could ask for in a keyboard of this level. It will satisfy the most demanding of you thanks to its good responsiveness, its neat finishes and its generous equipment. Even if its price is a bit high, it has everything you would expect from a high-end gaming keyboard. However, it is regrettable that it only comes with two switch configurations.

 

Budget alternative

Razer Cynosa v2

This second version of Razer's basic keyboard remains a relevant solution for everyone thanks to its comfort and wide range of possibilities.

£ 59.73 on Amazon

Razer Cynosa V2

This membrane keyboard has also made its mark in the gaming world thanks to its efficient keystroke, its customisation options and its good keystroke comfort. The Synapse 3 software is also an excellent solution at the moment, although it is less intuitive than iCUE. Unlike the K55 RGB Pro XT, it does not have a wrist rest, but this is hardly noticeable. These two shortcomings make it an alternative to our selection, but it is still a very viable device.

 

Mid-range alternative

Corsair K70 MK.2

Developed in a variety of switch configurations, this mechanical keyboard has something for just about every gamer. Responsive and comfortable, it offers an excellent quality equipment.

£ 159.00 on Amazon

Just like its predecessor, it is a bestseller. Its high quality finish emphasises its neat ergonomic design and the many possibilities it offers. The large number of switches available allows you to choose the most suitable ones for your use. In the end, apart from the lack of macro keys, the Corsair K70 MK.2 has just about everything to please. The price is a bit high, but the quality of the equipment should last you a few years. In our opinion, it is on a par with the Roccat keyboard. A TKL version is also available.

 

High-end alternative

Razer Huntsman V2

This gaming keyboard is Razer's high-end proposition. It is a truly competitive model thanks to its many advantages, including its comfort and Synapse software.

£ 199.99 on Amazon

Razer Huntsman V2

If you have the budget, the Huntsman V2 is a particularly good choice if you are looking for a comfortable, full-featured keyboard with an equally effective software. It is also available in different versions with different switches or in a smaller format. However, the backlight lacks homogeneity and the secondary function keys are not very bright.

 

Our selection

Our choice, Best mid-rangeBest budgetBest high-endBudget alternativeMid-range alternativeHigh-end alternative
Roccat Vulcan 122 SteelSeries Apex 3 Corsair K100 RGB Razer Cynosa v2 Corsair K70 MK.2 Razer Huntsman V2
It is with this model that Roccat really established itself among the top-of-the-range keyboards when it came out. It is quiet and responsive, and compensates for its lack of macro with an efficient in-house system. This membrane keyboard has everything to please and is perfect for gamers on a budget as well as those who don't like mechanical switches. It is suitable for long sessions thanks to its neat ergonomics. This mechanical keyboard has everything you would expect from a high-end model: quality equipment, responsiveness, comfort, dedicated macro and multimedia keys, well-made RGB and effective anti-ghosting. This second version of Razer's basic keyboard remains a relevant solution for everyone thanks to its comfort and wide range of possibilities. Developed in a variety of switch configurations, this mechanical keyboard has something for just about every gamer. Responsive and comfortable, it offers an excellent quality equipment. This gaming keyboard is Razer's high-end proposition. It is a truly competitive model thanks to its many advantages, including its comfort and Synapse software.
£ 149.99 on Amazon £ 69.99 on Amazon £ 229.99 on Amazon £ 59.73 on Amazon £ 159.00 on Amazon £ 199.99 on Amazon

 

800+ Comparisons
1000+ Reviews
100% Impartial

Why trust us ?

Selectos compares and tests hundreds of products to help you buy better. We sometimes receive a commission when you buy through our links, which helps fund our work. Learn more

 

How did we test?

First of all, when unpacking, we analysed the design and materials of the different keyboards. We also checked the quality of other components such as the cable or the wrist rest, if included. Then we connected the keyboard to our test computer and moved on to the configuration stage.

After a little familiarisation with the dedicated software, we created a specific profile consisting of macros (where available), custom lighting and some remapped keys. Finally, the real test came with a 30-minute game session followed by a few minutes of typing to check the comfort, ergonomics and responsiveness of the various keyboards.

 

How to choose your gaming keyboard?

With the development of e-sports, state-of-the-art equipment is becoming more and more common. Headsets, mouses, keyboards or even chairs specially designed for gamers are proliferating on the market.

However, you do not have to be a professional gamer to enjoy the experience of a good keyboard. But with so many models and configurations on the market, how can you be sure you are making the right choice?

Clavier Gamer

First of all, know that there are two main types of keyboards available to players:

  • Membrane keyboards: they use a layer of silicone to modify the impedance of a printed circuit. Their advantages are their price (for about £8,41 you can get one), and the fact that they are silent. However, they have less durability and are slower than a mechanical keyboard (key feedback is lower, so overall typing is slower), making them less suitable for fast and precise gaming.
  • Mechanical keyboards: they use a micro-switch with a spring for each key. Their advantages are numerous: comfort, speed (the feedback of the keys is faster and more constant), precision (the noise that the key makes shows us whether or not it has been pressed), durability (if a key no longer works, there is no need to change the whole keyboard). However, they are noisier and more expensive.

Clavier Gamer

Moreover, you should know that mechanical gaming keyboards have built-in switches (placed under the keys, they change the sensitivity of the keystrokes). These switches are either linear, which means that their resistance is only constituted by their spring, or tactile, i.e. with a resistance at mid-height allowing to feel the moment when the pressure is taken into account, authorising a less light but more assured keystroke. Here are the main ones: 

  • Cherry MX Red: they are of the linear type. As the force required to press the keys is constant, there is no need to crush the key, which enables a fast typing speed, but no errors. This is probably one of the most commonly used switches in gaming keyboards, because it offers no resistance.
  • Cherry MX Black: also linear, they offer more resistance than the MX Red and are popular for games where you often have to spam a key.
  • Cherry MX Blue: it is of the tactile type, but with an audible click (also called “clicky”). This means that there is a small obstacle when pressing the key that distinguishes “on” from “off”. Slightly noisier, it is often less recommended for gaming. It is preferred for typing, unless you are looking for precision.
  • Cherry MX Brown: it is tactile, but without an audible click. It is perhaps the most versatile between typing and gaming.
  • Cherry MX Speed: as its name suggests, it is the one with the fastest typing speed. It is indeed a very flexible linear keyboard, like the MX Red, but with key activation 0.5 mm higher. This results in very sensitive keys. It is therefore not recommended for those who make a lot of typing errors.
  • Cherry MX Silent: it is a version of the Cherry Red or Black, but where the recess has been reworked to be silent.
  • Proprietary switches: often inspired by the above models, they have been developed by a specific brand for its own products. As you will see in the rest of this article, Logitech and Razer are two good examples.

With these information, prior to your purchase, you should examine the following criteria:

Roccat Vulcan 122

  • Comfort: if you’re going to be spending a lot of time on your PC, look out for a wrist rest, as this will help prevent tendonitis and carpal tunnel syndrome. Some models offer a detachable wrist rest, so you can easily switch from one configuration to another.
  • Macro keys: these are programmable keys, very important in gaming in order to create shortcuts. Depending on the type of game you play (RPG, for example), they are even essential. They should be abundant and intelligently placed to maintain the ergonomics of the keyboard and to juggle smoothly between the normal keys and the macros. If not, the keyboard should at least have a software that can set up macros on the standard keys.

Razer Huntsman Tournament Edition

  • RGB (or RVB): this customisable backlight allows you to choose between 16.8 million colours. While this was originally introduced as a reaction to the unpleasant white of a standard backlight (essential for playing in the dark), it is now sometimes developed to warn you of certain factors (the keyboard takes on a different colour depending on the temperature of your graphics card, for example, saving you a lot of trouble). If used properly, it can be useful.
  • Anti-ghosting: ghosting is a phenomenon that occurs when the keyboard controller is not able to process simultaneous keystrokes at the same time. In gaming, this is a problem because it prevents you from performing certain combinations.

Razer Huntsman Tournament Edition

  • Wireless technology: when it comes to gaming keyboards, latency and reliability are essential. That’s why we generally don’t recommend wireless keyboards for gaming use.

 

Other recommended gamer keyboards

Razer Huntsman Tournament Edition (£129.99 upon publication): for e-sport fans. This TKL format mechanical keyboard is designed for gamers who take their equipment to competitions. It is full of qualities, including excellent ergonomics and extensive customisation via the Synapse software. However, the keys are a little too narrow for large hands and the sensitivity can cause some false moves at first.

Steelseries Apex Pro (£183.02 upon publication): an excellent high-end model and dispensable features. If you have a high budget and want a configurable product, the Apex Pro is a good solution. Whether it is via the dedicated programme or via the physical equipment (adjustable omnipoints switches), you can adapt it to your needs. Small bonus: an OLED screen can display information about your game. However, these features are dispensable for the average gamer, which explains its position in this section.

 

Other gamer keyboards tested

Corsair K55 RGB (£40.99 upon publication): another viable entry-level solution. The Corsair K55 RGB is a good solution for those looking for an interesting gamer keyboard on a very low budget. It relies on comprehensive and intuitive software that allows it to come close to models at twice the price, ensuring it offers good value for money. Of course, there are still limitations imposed by the compromises necessary for a low price, but these are clearly not prohibitive.

HyperX Alloy Core RGB  (£47.99 upon publication): splash-proof but lacking in functionality. In summary, the Alloy Core RGB is a decent keyboard that differs little from the standard models, due to the lack of dedicated software to reassign or program certain keys. Its real strength lies in its splash resistance… but that’s not all. It remains a viable solution for gamers who don’t want to break the bank.

Logitech G213 Prodigy (£64.99 upon publication): less complete than its competitors. With the G213 Prodigy, Logitech continues its trend of discreet but effective peripherals. The G213 Prodigy keyboard is quite comfortable and pleasant to use, no matter what you do. It’s still bulky and its backlighting is disappointing, which makes the picture less than pleasing at first glance.

 

 

Translated by Aylin Akturk 

Leave a comment